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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
you some of the figures. large cities produce 83% of economic output in the united states. the 30 largest cities in the u.s. account for half of all gdp. now, we're all in favor of good infrastructure until it comes time to pay for it. you say that some money can come from the private sector, but we've had some high-profile examples of public/private partnerships that have gone wrong. how do city governments make sure that city residents get what they pay for? >> i don't think there's any simple answer to this. and by the way, one reason when he we might want a national infrastructure bank is not for the money but just to provide oversight and ombudsman so that you have somebody to go to when off project or regulator, an interlocutor perhaps. we should definitely allow private money. there is an additional problem, and richard probably knows more about this, about so-called eminent domain, where you can't just clear things out. in china, they used to at least just knock on your door and say you're moving, we're building here a road here. you have to move out of your parm tomorrow.
in this country. we've done it in new york. this is the safest big city in the country. there are other large cities that are making real inroads against gun violence, but at the local level mayors and governors can't do it without leadership at the federal level, and, again, the passion and the comforting words from the president, they're important, but they're not nearly as important as the kind of leadership that he and congressman larson, his colleagues in congress, need to demonstrate now to get something done. >> congressman, before we go, i have to ask you, what factor do you think contributes the most to moving the ball forward on this? is it greater coverage in the media? is it more leadership from our politicians? what do you need to see to push for gun control reform in congress? >> well, clearly, clearly, it's all of the above, but most importantly, it's leadership from our elected officials. we are elected with a responsibility and a charge, and we have an obligation to speak out. if this were a terrorist attack and, frankly, i think these are domestic acts of terrorism. we would
more local or large city looks david roeder rights for the sun times, one of my favorites and put out a piece a couple days ago where he took three washington policy institutes and put together some of their research. he found if you just looked at large cities foreclosures were about 6% but the record is 6.1%. if you loosked at just chicago 8.7% foreclosure rate versus a year ago, year over year at 8.8. so only 0.1 better. if you specifically looked at cook county, their third quarter prices were down 3% year over year. you have the good, the bad, and it gets very difficult to just come up with one lump sum. one thing we can walk away with, it seems as though housing has bottomed. many states deal with the core process of foreclosures and there have been breakthroughs there. i've talked with many experts who really think there is still a shadow inventory of foreclosures that are going to be freed into 2013. you try to figure it out. the last, well maybe this is the credit market side of a possible positive for u.s. treasuries or some of the good ones like boon's. there's a "wall stre
will be doing great. the coastal cities, again, largely rain and travel delays will be impacted significantly where we have new york, philly and d.c. >> sounds like retailers can't catch a brick right now. superstorm system and now the storm is barreling its way across the country and with holiday pale at their weakest, heard that this morning, do retailers, can they make up for last yund. >> thank you. have, why don't you go first. what impact is it going to have? >> you have declining dispose al income and petter problems. you have the retailers that have inconspicuous stock and consumers are concerned about everything from hurricane sandy and the senseless slaughters in sandy hook, connecticut, spending less and giving more to charities. >> jan, i don't want to minimize any of this, the damage that this storm has already inflicted in parts of the country and could still inflict, but we were in an environment where people were just not shopping to begin with. do you think retailers could use this as a good excuse going forward? >> yeah, bert's here with me the four horsemen and apocalypse.
guns in their homes. and you can figure out when may not. it is a local new york city wit large circulation, they are saying that the gun control and the happening of newtown, connecticut are in the minds of this readers. so they published a map of where all handgun owners live. on the journal news website, all you have to do is zoom into a neighborhood and the locations of any gun permit holders will show up with red dots tap a dot, and the name and address of the permit holder pop up. the newspaper got the data by filing freedom of information requests with the clerks of the county. they do not indicate whether the residents own the guns just that they are legally able to. and homes are shot guns and rifles are not included because in those counties those can be bought but permits. but the news has brought backlash. the same complaint was made by some readers. i think aforesait was an irresp thing for them the to do. it's saying to robbers go to the home next door, they do not have a gun. or thieves that want to steal the guns will know where to get them. at this store, i spok
in syria. the large swath of the city that would be affected. it's estimated about 18,000 people would be killed in a day. let's get straight to barbara starr. and barbara, what have you learned tonight? >> well, you know, as tragic and serious as this is for the people of syria, this now has regional implications throughout the middle east. intelligence services from israel, turkey, jordan, lebanon, all the countries surrounding syria are talking with the united states around the clock about this very scenario because if there were to be god forbid a chemical attack, the concern is some could drift across borders. worse even as tragic as that would be, what if the regime collapses, terrorists move in, insurgent groups move in and grab some chemical material. they could take it across the borders into the neighbors countries and have a full fledged crisis in the region. >> there has been talk that assad may try and seek asylum. what are you being told about that and the possibilities? >> you know, there's a lot of rumors out there. the betting money is that the three countries that you
, large sections of kansas city on both the kansas and missouri sides will be wired. >> this is salt lake what you wanted. >> exactly -- this is exactly what you guys wanted. >> exactly. we want to take advantage of the faster speeds that google fire will bring and develop. the sky's the limit. >> reporter: how high is that? even the tech wizards aren't sure. >> you know, we've been asked that question a few times. the truthful answer is we don't know yet. we have a new technology that no one else has in the nation, and it can take our business to a new height that we didn't even dream of. >> reporter: the practical effects are easier to predict. better property values, more reasons for investment for top talent to come and stay. how much impact can all of this have on your city? >> i think at the end of the day if you ask any mayor growing that small business, finding that entrepreneur, willing to take a risk in your community is going to grow jobs and ultimately the economy. >> reporter: for now, dreams are growing wild out on the silicon prairie. tom foreman, cnn, kansas city, kansas.
. and finally, my personal favorite from new york city, they do three things all the time. and now ban the sale of large sodas and sugary drinks at restaurants. to curb obesity. like that is going to help. more than 200 of these laws will now be on the books come january 1. call me crazy or what. for more on what will look like in the new year, joined by university of maryland economics professor peter morrissey. great to see you again, has been a while, glad to have you back on. we talked about this before but what happens if we go over the cliff, the recession if there is no new deal. what people don't talk about, everybody agrees there'll be some sort of a recession and there is no deal. will the market be happy with any deal or are they looking for something specific? >> any deal would make them happy because that would mean we wouldn't have a recession necessarily. longer-term the market will require the united states to get a handle on the fiscal issues and to start to have a manageable plan on the deficits. we don't get that done in 2013, our bond rating will go down and maybe we print o
on to customers. >> here in the u.s., we've seen circuit city, the electronics store, borders, the bookstore go out of business. largely because of competition with amazon. >> reporter: based in seattle, amazon was started in the mid'90s to sell books online. and for years made no profit. but it soon became clear that founder jeff bezos and his notoriously secret company had bigger plans. they started expanding in the late 1990s into videos, music, games, electronics, kitchenware, clothing, shoes, jewelry. business services, information storage. amazon turned the corner to profitability in 2002 and today, amazon is a $100 billion global company. and though bezos declined our request for an interview, he recently told "fortune" magazine's andy serwer -- >> our goal is to become the most customer obsessed company. is there someone doing some element better than we? how do we improve? >> online shopping is still only 10% of total retail. >> reporter: meaning amazon in all likelihood is just getting started. ben stein told me recently he has never seen a company dominate a market quite the way amaz
. good to see you. we are here with the waterford crystal ball. very large. 12 feet in diameter. had no idea it was this large until i was right here on top of the building. it is a chilly start to the day here in new york city. looking at temperatures in the 30s. it feels much colder when you factor in the breeze. oned chills should be in the 20s. you have found el up. i have seen people rive about noon. 12-hours waiting out here until midnight. it will be much worse across places like the midwest with temperatures only in the single digits today. it will feel colder as well. in florida a nice day temperatures in the 70s. very typical. we have a new storm that we are going to be tracking. we are seeing areas of rain across portions of texas and tennessee on the northern side of the storm system you will be seeing areas of snow. keep that in mind tonight. >>> thank you. >>> now your starting lineup the top sports stories rg 3 is playoff wound. the rookie quarterback leading the redskins to the nfc east title in 1999. won in a winner take all game for the division. washington on a 7 g
? >> they don't occur all in the same city. they don't occur in the same neighborhoods. they're so rare, they don't occur clustered anywhere, fortunately. there it seems to me restricting access to highpowered weapons and large capacity magazines is a necessary step. as you point out, it's not going to lead to an immediate elimination or even, it seems to me, important reduction in the number of incidents. but overtime i'm reasonably certain it would lead to a reduction in the number of victims. we call these mass killings because of the number of victims involved. and if there's less access to the kinds of weapons that show up disproportionately to these killings over time, there should be fewer victims. >> we could have a tirter assault weapons ban going-forward as well. richard rosenfeld thank you very much for your time tonight. and your work on this issue. >> thank you, ezra. >>> you probably remember jack klugman, he was oscar madison on "the odd couple" and quincy. he was also the most heroic actor to play an american medical examiner in history. and that story is coming up. [ ma
. jordanian officials say it was first coordinated bombings at large shopping malls in ayman. almost simultaneously, machine gun and bomb attacks on cafe and hotels frequented by diplomats and tourists. with the city's police responding to those attacks, jordanian officials say the terrorists plan to launch the main assault on the u.s. embassy in amman. it's one of america's biggest embassies in the world. tom sanderson says the motivation for the attack was to show p capability. >> to inflict damage on the united states, inflict damage, physical and reputational, on the jordanian government in an environment in which all other governments are certainly dealing with their own difficulties right now. >> reporter: all 11 suspects were rounded up by jordanian security forces in mid october. jordanian officials say they'd planned to strike on november 9th, the seventh anniversary of the last al qaeda attack in jordan. when suicide bombers struck three hotels in amman, killing about 60 people. the man who claimed responsible for that attack was al zarqawi who led the group al qaeda in ira
. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. >>> we are getting pictures in here from michigan and show you and tell you what's happening there. there are large protests, basically closing down the state capitol building here. this is lansingmy, michigan. eight people arrested. there are a couple thousand people protesting inside the building. a number of them outside the capitol building. police, they say they're not letting anyone else inside. 50 state troopers are there on the ground. protests are over a push by the governor of michigan, rick snyder to make michigan a right to work state. letting workers in michigan decide whether or not they want to join unions. so the capitol is scheduled to close in just about two and a half hours from now. so police say anyone who refuses to leave will be arrested and will be charged with trespa trespassing. >>> i want to talk about this, though. one of the biggest companies, the biggest companies without a doubt in the world moving jobs out of china. bringing them back to america. apple c eo tim cook with this announcement. >>
of hartford. 60 miles outside of new york city. a decent sized town, population about 27,000. but the school district itself has about 5400 kids. it's a pretty large district. this school in particular, kindergarten through fourth grade as the wnyw helicopter moves closer to that town. alisyn: it's sandy hook elementary school. about that town it's a very, very pretty town. it has a lot of beautiful town squares, churches on corners with pretty old steeples. parts of it are historic. it shows that this sort of terror parents experience everywhere, sadly. this story happens everywhere and you can just imagine how parents are feeling as they are getting this news that something apparently has happened at this school today, and there were gunshots, and that someone is hurt, but beyond that it is hard to know if all the students are okay. we wish we could report that, but at this hour we don't have that information. bill: crime is very few to this town, very low. one violent criminal offense in 2010 is are being reported in newtown, connecticut. okay, we're working through this. we'll be on the
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)